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Wine News

New Zealand’s Yealands Winery fined $400,000 NZD for adding sugar to wine

Yealands, the winery that was started by Peter Yealands, has admitted to adulterating wine by adding sugar to the completed wine before exporting.
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Yealands, the winery that was established by Peter Yealands, has admitted to adulterating wine by adding sugar to the completed wine before exporting.

Peter Yealands, the owner at the time, General Manager Jeff Fyfe and winemaker Tamra Kelly, all pleaded guilty to the offence and have been fined.

Since the illegal act was carried out, Yealands winery has been sold and all have left the company. Tamra is now head winemaker at leading New Zealand winery Seresin.

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Wine is the most popular alcoholic beverage to take to a Christmas party, but most re-gift it

59% of people said wine was their first choice to take to a Christmas party, yet 31% of people claim that they re-gift wine they receive.
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Wine is he most popular alcoholic beverage to take to a Christmas party, but most re-gift it.

59% of people said wine was their first choice to take to a Christmas party, yet 31% of people claim that they re-gift wine they receive. The average Briton receives four bottles of wine throughout the Christmas period and gives away three bottles.

It was also revealed by Bordeaux Wines who commissioned the research, that the average spend on wine in the Christmas period rose from £5-£6 a bottle to £8.67.

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Restaurants are closing at a rate of 2% annually

Big store closures of chains may be getting the media excited, but small family restaurants appear to be hardest hit in the latest rounds of closure.
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Big store closures of chains may be getting the media excited, but small family restaurants appear to be hardest hit in the latest rounds of closure. The bulk of recent closures are from independents according to the new edition of the Market Growth Monitor from CGA and AlixPartners.

Family-owned Chinese, Indian and Italian restaurants have taken the biggest hit, and while a number of large chains have had to re-trench, the bigger chains are actually doing much better. CGA vice president Peter Martin said “bulk of closures are from independents, while managed groups remain in growth and this trend is welcome news for some of them, since it eases over-capacity and frees up more property. But these figures are a reminder that all restaurant brands need a well defined and brilliantly executed offer if they are to succeed in a survival of the fittest in 2019”.

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Spanish company Winabis has launched Europe's first cannabis infused wine

Winabis is the first cannabis or CBD infused wine that the company claims is legal in Europe.
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Winabis is the first cannabis or CBD infused wine that the company claims is legal in Europe.

The wine uses the UK legal Cannabidiol CBD rather than the psychoactive THC that is illegal in the UK for all but a few cases on doctors prescription.

The 9.5% ABV wine is available throughout Europe and will retail for €16.95 or €45 for three bottles. The emerald-hued wine is described as medium sweet with flavours of peach.

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New Zealand continues to lead the way in UK wine merchants and supermarkets

New Zealand saw sales volume and value grow in the UK to stretch its lead as a premium country in the UK.
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New Zealand continues to lead the way in the UK in wine merchants and supermarkets, with both sales volume and value growing in the UK to stretch its lead as the top premium country in the UK.

New Zealand now sells £483 million of wine to the UK, up 6.6% Nielsen data (MAT to 6 October 2018). Sauvignon Blanc is still the flagship and now accounts for 47% of all Sauvignon Blanc sold in wine retailers and supermarkets. But Pinot Noir is growing rapidly and New Zealand has cemented itself as the leading supplier of premium red wines with an average price of £9.43 for their reds which is almost a third higher than any other country.

The value of sales to the UK is up but so is the volume up 6.3% to 6,597,000 cases. The US is still New Zealand’s key export market by value, but the UK is slightly ahead in volume. In fact in the UK, with its much lauded premium pricing for NZ wines, is the country with the lowest average price of all New Zealand's top 15 key markets, according to the New Zealand Vine Growers 2018 annual report.

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The new world is getting old, while the old world is new

In 2019, New Zealand one of the darlings of the New World, will celebrate 200 years of making wine. Is 200 still New?
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The new world is getting old, while the old world is new it seems.
In 2019, New Zealand, one of the darlings of the New World, will celebrate 200 years of making wine. Australia’s first wines were on sale in the 1820’s and South Africa's world-renowned Constantia Estate was planted 333 years ago. While in America the first vines were planted at Senecu in 1629, some 389 years ago, so to call these the 'new' wines is a bit old hat.

Newer countries to turn their hand to wine include Norway, England and China. These old world countries are the New new!

New World countries were named so because British colonists would head off into the “New world” to explore. Later, the name came to mean a new wave of fruit driven style of wine, made using modern wine making techniques. However much of the old world has copied these techniques, and the new world has developed old world techniques so the difference between the two no longer exists.

The new New are often wine regions that have benefited from climate change. Yes, England grew grapes in Roman times but this all disappeared when the Romans left. It wasn't until the 1970’s that vines where re-planted and only in the last 20 years an industry has grown up.

China’s long march to wine has as much to do with it’s international opening up, and the communist party's desire to switch alcohol production to less arable land. But this ancient country is definitely New when it comes to the wine scene.

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